Monday Morning Video: Scruffy the Cat

Once upon a time there was a band called Scruffy the Cat. I have no idea where the name came from but it somehow fit the boisterous group from Boston. They rocked, rattled and rolled their way across the US for many a year, making a hearty racket wherever they went.

They played the label game and released a couple of albums but never quite found the notoriety that their music deserved. ‘tis a real shame as primary singer-songwriter Charlie Chesterman had a knack for writing infectious roots-based hooks that the band then raved up with reckless abandon.

The band’s legacy is being honored with not one, but two exciting releases in the coming weeks. Time Never Forgets: The Anthology (’86-’88) a 38-track collection of the band’s mid-1980’s recorded output is being released tomorrow.

Then, on Sept 16th, we’ll get The Good Goodbye: Unreleased Recordings 1984-1990. This collection includes 23 tracks culled from throughout the band’s time together.

In keeping with this double release, here is a video with a double dose of the band doing their thing back in the day. If this doesn’t get your foot a tappin’, if not a stompin’, then I don’t know what will.

Newport Folk Festival – Friday

Ryan Adams really summed up the 2014 Newport Folk Fest experience well when he said, “”Like ten years ago I was depressed and now I’m playing music with *&$%ing sailboats in the background.” The setting at the legendary festival is literally one of the most beautiful spots as it juts far out into Narragansett Bay. The boats were beautiful, if you happened to look at them for more than a passing glance. I noticed the setting briefly but was totally captivated by the music. The festival has certainly become the must-see spot for summer Americana fans. As other festivals have vastly changed direction, Newport has remained a consistent venue for some of the best folk/rock/americana/blues/R&B music.

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Ryan Adams

Starting with Friday’s headliner, everything really did seem to be looking up. After seeing him many times through the years, this show had him as upbeat as I’ve ever seen the erratic performer. He certainly acknowledged it as well. He couldn’t get enough of picking fun at bassist Charlie Savage and the crowd was eating it up. While there certainly was much of Ryan’s offbeat and rather eccentric commentary, it was so positive that it seemed like Ryan is a new man.

Now for the music. Ryan played some old favorites which included humorous commentary such as “Oh My Sweet Carolina” (which he called “bold-faced lies”), “Come Pick Me Up” (“a moment of stupidity”) and “Let It Ride.” He also played his new single “Gimme Something Good” and a variety of tunes from in between. Ryan walked on to stage looking like 10 years ago with his disheveled hair and denim jacket. But honestly, Ryan’s fun persona was the story.

I’ll be honest and say that I had lost track of fine songwriter of Rilo Kiley fame, Jenny Lewis. But a few minutes into her set at Newport and I knew I’d have to have a second look at her solo career. Lewis reminded me of a more Americana and more varied version of She & Him. She came out dressed like it was the summer of love with a painted Martin Acoustic Guitar to match. She went back and forth between the poppy, acoustic singer/songwriter, and the piano ballads. Her set was hard to walk away from.

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Jenny Lewis

I did have to check out Sun Kil Moon (Mark Kozelek). His gentle nylon stringed guitar picking and focus on untraditional songs certainly is a bit of an aquired taste. The songs often seem to meander along without a clear destination. In a live setting, seeing Mark play the tunes certainly helped him to connect a bit more with the audience. But Mark was the opposite of Ryan. He just seemed a bit down and didn’t seem to enjoy the show too much. Unfortunately, I didn’t catch my favorites from Sun Kil Moon’s – Ghost of the Great Highway.

I did catch a few of Robert Hunter’s songs. While he’s certainly no Jerry Garcia, Hunter’s connection with American Beauty classics “Friend of the Devil” and “Ripple” were great fun to watch. They fit so well with the festival atmosphere and Hunter did not hesitate to regale the crowd with anecdotes from way back when.

Other highlights of the first day at Newport 2014 included Mavis Staples sharing the stage with breakout band Lake Street Dive, powerful minimalist punk/old-time Devil Makes Three, and the ethereal sounds of Band of Horses.

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Lake Street Dive

In addition to the music, the setting could not have been better. While they were crowded, the space worked well for the different personalities within the crowd. Families had room to spread out on the lawn, those who wanted to drink could easily find their spot in the beer garden, and smaller groups could move between the four stages easily. The food had a variety of options including super fresh seafood (I enjoyed fantastic oysters and a lobster roll), grassfed beef burgers, and a variety of other options. As a quick break from the sun, I tried my hand at the rather small Deering Banjo tent.

Two minor complaints, the heat and the parking. Water was available everywhere and it is the middle of teh summer. Fort Adams State Park juts out into the bay  and that means there is one way out of the park. Lots of parking, one way out. So it took a while staying until the end and then trekking out to the car.

The quality of the music and the overall experience certainly made up for any minor complaints. The Newport Folk Fest has been able to iron out any kinks after over 50 years and it showed.

Photos by Suzanne McMahon

Mayer’s Playlist for August 2014, Part 1

ALBUMS OF THE MONTH

Too Blessed to be Stressed, by Paul Thorn

Paul ThornIt has been a bit of a wait for some new music from Tupelo Mississippi’s second favorite musical son. Thorn bridged the gap between 2010’s Pimps and Preachers and now with What the Hell Is Goin On, a fun covers album. While I certainly enjoyed his re-working of lesser-known songs by Allen Toussaint and Lindsay Buckingham, it made me that much more eager for a collection of Thorn originals. Thankfully, the wait is over.

There has always been an endearing quality to Thorn’s songwriting and it is in fine form on Too Blessed to be Stressed. Mix one part optimism with one part humor, peppered with a dash of realism, and this is the sound that emerges.

“Mediocrity’s King” is a great example. The song finds Thorn lamenting the state of everything from culture to government. “They manufacture stars on a tv stage, Johnny Cash couldn’t get arrested today,” he declares before really letting loose:

When you don’t expect much then you’re never let down
You get the kind of government we’ve got now
Republicans and Democrats are breaking my heart
I can’t tell them sons of bitches apart

Thorn rachets up the humor on “Backslide on Friday.” An ambling beat shuffles him through the days of the week. I sin on Saturday, I repent on Sunday” he sings, “then I tell myself I won’t procrastinate on Monday, Tuesday I do like I should.” It leads to the inevitable conclusion captured in the song’s title.

The fun continues with the Mississippi boogie of “Real Goodbye,” a stout kiss-off to a new ex. “My future’s bright now that I’ve put you in the past,” he proclaims, “hasta la vista, syonara, kiss my ass.”

Thorn’s infectious optimism shines brightest on “Don’t Let Nobody Rob You of Your Joy.” The song slowly builds from a subdued opening to a soaring finale as Thorn shares “the words that my Grandpa always said.” Words to live by, indeed.

Audio Download: Paul Thorn, “Real Goodbye”

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THE PLAYLIST


Tears Don’t Matter Much, Lucero (from the INgrooves release Live in Atlanta)

I expect that I’m not alone when I saw that Lucero are one of those bands from whom I’ve long awaited a live release (I’m looking at you, too, Patrick Sweany). Well, the boys from Memphis have finally delivered. Recorded over three nights in Atlanta late last year, the band culled thirty-two tracks spanning the band’s nearly fifteen year career. Some fans may quibble a bit but it plays like a greatest hits album. From the horns on “That Much Further West” to the roar of the crowd on “Tears Don’t Matter Much,” Live in Atlanta finds the band is exceptional form.


Neon Hearts, Jim Lauderdale (from the release I’m a Song)

I suppose that we shouldn’t be surprised that Jim Lauderdale has amassed an impressive array of friends over his more than thirty year career in the music business. He has worked with artists ranging from Elvis Costello to Robert Hunter and Patty Loveless to, of course, frequent collaborator Buddy Miller. Many of these friends appear, both as co-songwriters and performers, on his tuneful new twenty-song collection.

With one foot firmly grounded in classic country era, Lauderdale still manages to have a satisfying freshness. Let’s call it vintage without feeling dated. We can also call it damn good.


Prettiest Girl, Ben Miller Band (from the New West Records release Any Way, Shape or Form)

This Missouri-based three-piece makes a mighty fine racket. Singer-songwriter Miller and his cronies — Scott Leeper on the washtub bass and Doug Dicharry on percussion, trombone and various other instruments — play country and bluegrass with a healthy dose of attitude. The group often infuses its songs with Miller’s slide guitar to give them extra edge. Here’s one of the more traditional numbers from their fine new record.


Cruel Alibis, Mustered Courage (from the release Powerlines)

This trio from Australia seem determined to crack the US bluegrass scene. If their US debut is any indication, they’ve clearly got the chops to do it. There’s both energy and buoyancy to their music, with songs chock full of catchy pop melodies.

Audio Download: Mustered Courage, “Cruel Alibis”

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Feet Back on the Ground, Dead Fingers (from the Pipe & Gun/Communicating Vessels release Big Black Dog)

Alabama husband and wife duo Kate and Taylor Hollingsworth have a great ramshackle sound. They start with enticing pop melodies and build raw yet immaculately crafted arrangements around them. From the haunting “Pomp & Circumstance” to the scampering “Feet Back on the Ground,” they deliver the goods.

Audio Stream: Dead Fingers, “Feet Back on the Ground”

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Messin’ Around, Quiet Life (from the Mama Bird Recording Co. release Housebroken Man)

Although the quartet call Portland, Oregon home, their more likely to be found somewhere on the road. Their forthcoming ep reflects their wanderlust ways with an eclectic sound that runs from the honky-tonk of “Messin’ Around” to their intensely dark rock and roll cover of Townes Van Zandt’s “Waiting Around to Die.”

Down by the Green River

It’s the best little festival you’ve never heard of. At least I hadn’t until this year. Who knew that over the span of 28 years the little known festival in central Massachusetts would host the likes of Gillian Wellch, Mavis Staples, Alison Kraus & Union Station, Buddy Guy, and Lucinda Williams to name a few. This year is really no different. Green River Festival 2014 combined local favorites with national acts. Little did I know that it has been a coming out party for years and perhaps this year’s festival could easily be the same.

At the close of the day, headliner Josh Ritter took the stage as heavy storms passed through the area and periodically soaked the audience. But happy-go-lucky Ritter was not to be deterred. Twangville photographer Suzanne and I had seen his brilliant acoustic show this spring so I was expecting a lot. While I enjoyed the set as I was running for cover, I did find that Josh’s newer material from “Beast in Its Tracks” is particularly well suited to the acoustic setting from the spring. At Green River, Ritter wisely opted for lots of his old favorites. “Kathleen,” “Right Moves,” and “Good Man” all got the crowd rocking. Ritter’s buoyant personality kept the show just as fun despite the uncooperative weather.

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Trampled by Turtles played their usual frantic mix of rock music played with bluegrass instruments. I think calling this music bluegrass is a bit of a stretch but it certainly is compelling. “Are You Behind the Shining Star?” a track from their newest album “Wild Animals,” slows down just enough to let Dave Simonett’s brilliant lyrics and vocal delivery shine. The band certainly ups the emotion when the songs get a chance to breathe at a slower tempo. Many tunes take on an epic and ethereal quality that is quite unique in Americana today.

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Boston favorite Girls, Guns & Glory led off the festival with Hank Williams’ inspired classic country. One of Boston’s finest Americana songwriters, Ward Hayden has a voice all his own. GGG is musically tight, featuring the country licks of guitarist Chris Hersch. The band’s set mixed a variety of classic country sounding tunes with some that don’t fit in so neatly under that umbrella. Particularly, live favorite “All the Way Up to Heaven” sounded like a new twist on an old theme. The band has clear roots but manages to sound original at the same time. “I Saw the Light,” “Lonesome Train,” and “You, You, You” brought the crowds who didn’t know the band to their stage. The band is surely growing beyond Boston’s best kept secret with performances like these. They have managed to realize a vision with a reverence for the past that fits in the current Americana landscape.

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The boys of Barnstar had been working on their new record this past winter and the Green River Festival was a rare opportunity to see the boys play the songs live. They have their own take on Americana: songwriters’ bluegrass. What do I mean by that? They trade in the usual bluegrass instrumentals for a focus on vocally centered songs. I had the opportunity to see the band in the studio and saw a window into how the band balances their other careers (they have other bands, solo projects, work with other artists that keep them extremely busy). But the band’s vocals are tight and show an increasing focus on the high harmonies of bluegrass. Mark Erelli’s vocals, particularly on Josh Ritter cover “Darlin,’” give the band a lead vocal focus this time around. Father son tandem, Taylor (high harmony and mandolin)  and Jake Armerding (fiddle) anchor the band in the bluegrass tradition. But the band certainly does have their own take on bluegrass with such a variety of unique songwriting voices.  With Mark Erelli’s vocals leading the way, Rod Stewart’s “Stay With Me” gets a bit of a soul bluegrass treatment; it turns out to be quite irresistible and an appealing teaser of their forthcoming record.


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All-in-all, the festival had lots of great food, vendors, and music to match. Not to mention that the festival features an eclectic mix of Americana acts. While the weather deteriorated by the end, the laid back festival was certainly a wonderful way to spend a summer day.

Photos by Suzanne McMahon

Readers’ Pick: Long in the Tooth by Billy Joe Shaver

You picked Long in the Tooth by Billy Joe Shaver as your favorite for the week of August 5, 2014.

Readers’ Top Picks (last 4 weeks)

  1. Terms Of My Surrender by John Hiatt (16)
  2. Acoustic Classics by Richard Thompson (15) [7/22]
  3. Long in the Tooth by Billy Joe Shaver (13) [7/29]
  4. They Want My Soul by Spoon (12) [7/29]
  5. Still on the Levee by Chris Smither (12) [7/22]
  6. Hypnotic Eye by Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers (10) [7/29]
  7. The Voyager by Jenny Lewis (6) [7/29]
  8. Don’t Wait Up for George by Shooter Jennings (5) [7/29]
  9. Wild Animals by Trampled by Turtles (4)
  10. A Life Worth Living by Marc Broussard (3) [7/29]

Don’t forget to vote in our weekly poll to help us make this list.