Sena Ehrhardt – Live My Life

Sena Ehrhardt is a big voice from a smal town. Ehrhardt’s third album, Live My Life, is a polished musical offering that is sure to cement her reputation as a rising star in blues music.

Originally from a southern Minnesota town known more for lunch meat than blues music, the dynamic singer inherited her passion for blues from her father, who worked in regional blues bands for 40 years.  She attributes her ambition to growing up in a musical household and credits opportunities to see touring acts, including a performance by Luther Allison shortly before his death that took her breath away.  After graduating from college, she paid her early dues in her father’s band, Plan B, which gradually became the Sena Ehrhardt Band when her reputation took hold.  On her first two albums, Leave the Light On in 2011 and All In last year, her band continued to be a family affair, with her father anchoring as lead guitarist.

Sena Ehrhardt

But on Live My Life, Cole Allen replaced father Ed on guitar and also became her songwriting partner.  The album, like the glossy cover, is slicker than her earlier albums and may have some crossover appeal among rock audiences.  But at its heart it is still a blues album, and Ehrhardt’s talent is in the blues.

Live My Life is a mix of originals and covers.  Ehrhardt and Allen’s “Things You Should Know” and “Everybody is You” are solid tunes.  The title tune, written by Allen, is a fine blues-rocker.  She also does a good job on covers such as Leon Russell’s “Help Me Through the Day” and Albert Collins’ “If Trouble Was Money.”

Along with Ehrhardt and Allen, the album features St. Paul Peterson and Rick Roussell on bass, Michael Bland and Paul Peterson on drums, and Bruce McCabe on piano, with guest appearances by rhythm guitarist Jimi “Primetime” Smith and slide guitarist Smokin’ Joe Kubek.  The album was produced by prolific Minneapolis sound master David Z.

Audio Stream: Sena Ehrhardt, “Everybody Is You”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

Twangville Fall Release Preview

Yup, the fall release calendar is shaping up quite nicely, thank you. Here are just a few that we at Twangville are excited to hear.


Shovels and Rope

SWIMMIN’ TIME by SHOVELS AND ROPE
(25 Aug on Dualtone Records)


Justin Townes Earle

SINGLE MOTHERS by JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE
(9 Sept on Vagrant Records)


Ryan Adams

RYAN ADAMS by RYAN ADAMS
(9 Sept on Pax Am/Blue Note Records)


Joe Fletcher

YOU’VE GOT THE WRONG MAN by JOE FLETCHER
(23 Sept)


Lucinda Williams

DOWN WHERE THE SPIRIT MEETS THE BONE by LUCINDA WILLIAMS
(30 Sept on Thirty Tigers Records)


Shakey Graves

AND THE WAR CAME by SHAKEY GRAVES
(7 Oct on Dualtone Records)


Matthew Ryan

BOXERS by MATTHEW RYAN
(14 Oct)

Photos that ROCK! Newport Folk Festival 2014

Ryan Adams

Ryan Adams

When the e-mail arrived confirming my press credentials for the Newport Folk Festival, I did a little dance around my living room. Not only is this the holy grail of music festivals (you may remember an incident with Bob Dylan and an electric guitar in 1965…), but I have been not-so- patiently waiting 12 years to photograph one of my favorite musicians: Mr. Ryan Adams. I’m sure that many other photographers during this set got a kick out of the huge smile that was plastered to my face like a small child. Going through these photos was especially exciting because even though I was crammed into the pit, the lighting was great, and I was able to shoot from many different angles. Here are some of my favorites!

Jenny Lewis

Jenny Lewis

Lake Street Dive

Lake Street Dive

Shovels & Rope

Shovels & Rope

Deer Tick

Deer Tick

Sara Watkins- Nickel Creek

Sara Watkins- Nickel Creek

Nickel Creek

Nickel Creek

Ryan Adams

Ryan Adams

All photos by Suzanne Davis Photography (www.facebook.com/suzannedavisphotography)

Newport Folk Festival – Saturday

With his days in the blues-rock duo White Stripes now comfortably behind him, Jack White has become a bit of a generational connector. He’s paid homage to country, blues and rock legends, yet he keeps winning new fans. When he stepped on to the stage at Newport Folk Fest, the standing area at the front of the fort swallowed much of the fans lounging on their blankets. Young and old fans alike stood up to listen to the sound.

White’s set included several blues covers that fit the venue so well. He gave them his blues rock treatment though he did have a fiddle and mandolin player (though they were a bit hard to make out in the mix). He included Son House tune “Death Letter,” Blind Willie Johnson cover “John the Revelator,” and “Goodnight, Irene” by Leadbelly. White certainly made these songs his own as his palpable energy as he got the crowd into a frenzy. White also included a country tinged “We’re Going to Be Friends” in the mix of his signature blues rock. White’s guitar work and songwriting are varied and move between blues, rock, and country without a second thought.

Chris Thile & Sara Watkins of Nickel Creek

Chris Thile & Sara Watkins of Nickel Creek

Just before the headliner, Nickel Creek brought their expert musicianship and unique songwriting style to the for stage. While the crowd seemed somewhat restless at the start, the trio rocked the house with their traditional bluegrass instrumentation. Sara Watkins’ “Destination” was a particular favorite. The band played with such aggression that the fans had no choice but to take notice. Sean Watkins’ more traditional songwriting and flatpicking on the “21st of May” continues to be a favorite from the band’s recent record “A Dotted Line” (after a seven year hiatus). Chris Thile’s mandolin work and singing managed to accentuate the emotions of the songs. I can see why he’s received the Macarthur Genius Grant. Thile contributed the simple beauty and melodic mandolin picking on the “Lighthouse Tale,” “Ode to A Butterfly,” and new tune “Somebody More Like You.” Thile also did an unannounced intimate mandolin workshop. Unfortunately, I didn’t check my phone quick enough to get in!

Sean Watkins

Sean Watkins

The day also included several duos. The Milk Carton Kids are two guys who sing and play acoustic guitar. Their show fit the more intimate quad stage. The two sound like Gillian Welch and David Rawlings guitar work with a bit of Simon & Garfunkel’s tight harmonies thrown in. I don’t make that comparison lightly and their songs are not as striking as the aforementioned artists so far. Vocalist Joey Ryan also included some of the funniest deadpan humor I’ve ever heard. His bit could have easily been used for standup. He went into a monologue about how father’s don’t get enough credit for the the difficulty of childbirth based on his recent experience. He also went on to list the difficulties including that he had to miss a gig for his son’s birth. Then he went on to describe how he could talk to his son for hours and hours and that he couldn’t do that with adults. This comedic intro certainly garnered at least as much applause as the songs and with good reason. He was hilarious. Musically, the band played clean arrangements and Kenneth Pattengale added in harmonized guitar work.

Carry Ann Hearst & Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope

Cary Ann Hearst & Michael Trent of Shovels & Rope

An earlier duo, Shovels & Rope, easily rocked the Fort Stage. Carry Ann Hearst and Michael Trent needed no help to bring the stage to life. They switched back and forth between guitar and drums. They harmonize and accent each other’s tunes in whatever way they can. As a husband and wife duo, they seem to get as much energy from one another as they do from the crowd. The pair have a striking variety of different tunes that all seem to rock out in one way or another. I can see why the two came together and committed to the duo.

Carry Ann Hearst

Cary Ann Hearst

After two days of music, I learned of the ways that artists are bending genres in such creative ways. Folk becomes punk or blues or country and back again. The artists brought it all together and used their voices to show how different it became.

Photos by Suzanne McMahon