Monday Morning Video: Matthew Ryan “The World Is”

I generally focus on live performance videos for our Monday Morning Video series however I’m going to make an exception this week. Longtime Twangville fave Matthew Ryan will be releasing a new album on October 14th. We’re beyond excited for it but, not surprisingly, the anticipation has sent us back into his archives.

“The World Is,” from 2009′s Dear Lover is a stunner.

‘Cause the world
Is held together
With lies and promises
And broken hearts
And brand new days
For you to start
All over again

Ryan has already previewed a couple of songs from the album, to be titled Boxers. These include the outstanding “An Anthem for the Broken,” which was released earlier this year to raise funds for Twangville friend John Anderson in his battle with ALS (learn more). If these are any indication, then the new album is quite the electric affair.

So while we wait for Boxers, enjoy this exquisite ballad. And get ready to be jarred awake by the guitar-driven fury of Ryan’s forthcoming release.

Sugar Ray & the Bluetones – Living Tear to Tear

Sugar Ray & the Bluetones have added an entertaining gem to their long list of album releases with Living Tear to Tear.   From the first notes blown through Sugar Ray Norcia’s harmonica on “Rat Trap,” the album is a pleasure to hear.

Sugar RayIt’s not surprising that harpist Sugar Ray Norcia, a former member of Roomful of Blues, is a master at his craft. Roomful of Blues, a fine outfit in its own right, has become a stamp of quality for its alumni. The lexicon of blues masters who, along with Norcia, have been affiliated with Roomful of Blues include guitarists Duke Robillard and Ronnie Earl, trumpeter/cornetist Al Basile, and pianists Al Copley and Ron Levy – all musical standouts.

Norcia, who founded the first version of the Bluetones in the late 1970s, formally became a member of Roomful of Blues in the early 1990s.  But he had been playing with those guys for years.  Ronnie Earl, who took over from Duke Robillard as lead guitar, had been one of the original Bluetones.  Norcia’s decades of experience playing with great musicians ala Roomful of Blues shows on Living Tear to Tear.  The album includes a collection of original tunes written not only by Norcia but also by Bluetones Monster Mike Welch, Michael “Mudcat” Ward, and Anthony Geraci, with a couple of standards added in.  “Here We Go,” which you can stream below, was written by Welch.

On Living Tear to Tear, the Bluetones’ tight lineup includes  Welch on guitar, Ward on bass,  Geraci on piano, and Neil Garouvin on drums.

Audio Stream: Sugar Ray & the Bluetones, “Here We Go”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Photos that ROCK! Newport Folk Festival 2014

Ryan Adams

Ryan Adams

When the e-mail arrived confirming my press credentials for the Newport Folk Festival, I did a little dance around my living room. Not only is this the holy grail of music festivals (you may remember an incident with Bob Dylan and an electric guitar in 1965…), but I have been not-so- patiently waiting 12 years to photograph one of my favorite musicians: Mr. Ryan Adams. I’m sure that many other photographers during this set got a kick out of the huge smile that was plastered to my face like a small child. Going through these photos was especially exciting because even though I was crammed into the pit, the lighting was great, and I was able to shoot from many different angles. Here are some of my favorites!

Jenny Lewis

Jenny Lewis

Lake Street Dive

Lake Street Dive

Shovels & Rope

Shovels & Rope

Deer Tick

Deer Tick

Sara Watkins- Nickel Creek

Sara Watkins- Nickel Creek

Nickel Creek

Nickel Creek

Ryan Adams

Ryan Adams

All photos by Suzanne Davis Photography (www.facebook.com/suzannedavisphotography)

Mud Morganfield & Kim Wilson – For Pops: A Tribute to Muddy Waters

Larry “Mud” Morganfield and Kim Wilson have put together a collaboration that features 1950s Chicago Blues akin to Morganfield’s famous father, McKinley Morganfield – Muddy Waters. And the surprisingly good tribute album by Waters’ eldest son and the frontman from the Fabulous Thunderbirds, For Pops: A Tribute to Muddy Waters, captures that Muddy Waters feel without knocking off any obvious hits like “Hoochie Coochie Man,” “I’ve Got My Mojo Working” or “Mannish Boy.”

MudMud Morganfield is one of two of Waters’ sons – the other is Big Bill Morganfield – who are making a name for themselves in their father’s business.   He didn’t consider a music career until after his father’s death in 1983, becoming a professional truck driver for a time instead.  But since 2000, Mud has been building a solid reputation.  releasing his first album, Fall Waters Fall, in 2008.  His second album, Son of  the Seventh Son, released in 2012, included a number of original songs and received some positive critical notice.   Wilson, of course, has held the Fabulous Thunderbirds together since Jimmie Vaughan left the band in in the late eighties.  The band managed to hang together through some ups and downs and, with the release of On the Verge in 2012,  received critical notice as glowing as during their heyday of the seventies and eighties.

On For Pops, Mud’s round baritone vocals and Wilson’s harmonica establish a a great core for the project, but the veteran crew including guitarists Billy Flynn, who played with Chicago blues standout Jimmy Dawkins and the Legendary Blues Band (with Waters’ sidemen Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and Pinetop Perkins) and Rusty Zinn, Barrelhouse Chuck on piano, former Ronnie Earl sideman Steve Gomes on bass and drummer Robb Stupka, who frequently backed the legendary Luther Allison.

For Pops is a tour de force that covers a range of offerings written by Muddy Waters, such as “Gone to Main Street,”Still a Fool,” and “Blow Wind Blow.”  It also includes songs written by others for Muddy, such as Willie Dixon’s  “I Don’t Know Why” and “I Love the Life I Live, I Live the Life I Love” and Bernard Roth’s “Just to Be With You.”  None of the songs were huge hits for Muddy, but they all have that signature Muddy Waters sound, especially when played by this group of veteran musicians. 

Audio Stream: Mud Morganfield and Kim Wilson, “Still a Fool”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.